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2018 LSK Linguistic School (LSKLS)
- Linguistics and Beyond -
February 5-7, 2018
Seoul National University




We are excited to announce the 1st Winter Linguistic School organized by the Linguistic Society of Korea. The theme is Linguistics and Beyond, and the goal of the School is to provide advanced training in linguistics and its interfaces highlighting up-to-date theoretical advances in related fields. The event will take place at Seoul National University from February 5th to 7th, 2018.

The School will feature series of invited lectures on

  1. Neurolinguistics (Jonathan Brennan)
  2. Sign Language (Jeremy Kuhn)
  3. Experimental Syntax (Jon Sprouse)

We particularly welcome undergraduate and graduate students for participation from the field of linguistics and/or its adjacent fields including cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, semiotics, AI-engineering, and the like.

Venue
Shinyang Hall I (4-Dong) #302, College of Humanities
Seoul National University


Supported by
  • Graduate School of TESOL, Cyber Hankuk University of Foreign Studies
  • BK21 PLUS Project "Multilingualism and Multiculturalism"
  • NRF-supported "Modeling an Optimal Research Program for Experimental Syntax in Korean" Project

Registration

Registration fee is

  1. for non-members, KRW 150,000 (cash only, on-site registration).
  2. for regular LSK members, KRW 50,000 (cash only, on-site registration).
*Please note that the LSK offers a scholarship opportunity of KRW 100,000 for those with no external funding on a competition basis.

Those who wish to apply for the LSK scholarship for LSKLS,

  1. please fill out the form (see the attachment) in English or Korean, and
  2. submit it to 2018LSKLS@gmail.com by no later than January 15, 2018 Detailed instructions are included in the form).

If there is any inquiry, please contact 2018LSKLS@gmail.com.


Course plan
Feb 5 (M) Feb 6 (T) Feb 7 (W)
9:00-11:30 Sprouse Kuhn Brennan
11:30-12:30 Lunch break
12:30-15:00 Brennan Sprouse Kuhn
15:00-15:15 Coffee break
15:15-17:45 Kuhn Brennan Sprouse


Course descriptions
1. Neurolinguistics
  Invited Lecturer: Jonathan Brennan (University of Michigan)

This course introduces the neural machinery behind our ability to speak and understand language. In three sessions we will cover: (i) neurolinguistic questions and methods, (ii) the brain bases of speech perception and phonology, and (iii) syntax and semantics. Special attention will be given to how theories of linguistic computations and representations can inform, and be informed by, our understanding of the brain.

2. Sign Language
  Invited Lecturer: Jeremy Kuhn (Institut Jean Nicod, CNRS, Ecole Normal Supérieure)

Since the 1970s, sign languages have been known to be natural human languages, complete with their proper histories and grammars. Over the last few decades, linguistic work on sign language has given us a fuller understanding of the human language capacity, allowing us to abstract away from the acoustic channel and observe new properties that only emerge in the visuospatial modality. After establishing some basics of sign language linguistics, this mini-course will cover the phonology, syntax, and semantics of sign languages. In each domain, we will see that sign language fits into known typologies, but that unique properties of sign language can be used to gain linguistic insights: resolving existing debates or opening new questions. The goal of this course is to provide students and more senior researchers with a strong background for following future research contributions coming from sign language research in order to incorporate these insights into their own research problems. No prior knowledge of a sign language is required.

3. Experimental Syntax
  Invited Lecturer: Jon Sprouse (University of Connecticut)

The goal of this mini-course is to introduce students to the design and analysis of formal acceptability judgment experiments from start to finish. We will cover all of the major components of an experiment: extracting testable predictions from hypotheses, creating materials, distributing items across lists, constructing a presentation order, choosing the most appropriate task, deploying the experiment, exploring and analyzing the results, and creating publication quality figures. We will work through concrete examples from a real experiment (on island effects in English), and use R scripts that can be modified for use with future experiments. There is a lot to cover in just three sessions, so the general plan will be to discuss the major points of each topic, explore concrete examples, and then point to slides, scripts, and additional readings that students can use to construct their own experiments.



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[Download] Financial Support Application Form
Please direct all enquiries to 2018LSKLS@gmail.com